Pain on inward pointing calf raise

Discussion in 'What Not To Do' started by liero, Nov 7, 2015.

  1. liero

    liero Valued Member

    I was playing around with foot position during a seated calf raise (using a machine leg press machine). I pointed my toes together like in the photo link below.

    http://www.popsugar.com/fitness/photo-gallery/31081972/image/31081977/Calf-Raises-Internal-Rotation

    During the move my right hip 'popped', it's an area that has had some mobility issues in the past, and pain. After the initial discomfort of the pop my hip felt surprisingly good.

    I did a little review which suggests that rotation of the foot position may be beneficial for the calves.

    http://blog.brianschiff.com/?p=877

    http://www.nsca.com/education/articles/does-foot-position-matter-with-the-calf-raise-exercise/

    I didn't have any similar popping feeling during 'straight footed calf raise' in my hip.

    I'm curious of how the foot position on the calf raise improved the positioning and reduced the pain in my hip. My hypothesis is the change to the 'head of the gastroc' mentioned in the first quote. Is this likely?

    The other possibility was that it was the pressure of the weight itself driving my hips in? Though it was only 50% bodyweight, my legs were at full extension (it is a calf raise).

    Sometimes things are known to "unlock" during exercise. Will continually doing this help my hip, or hinder it? I could isolate the calf raise with only bodyweight, or keep doing them under weight- Placing different levels of "popping potential" on the vulnerable link in the chain. Thoughts?
     
  2. Van Zandt

    Van Zandt Mr. High Kick

    My guess is internal hip rotation under load created space in your joint capsule. The audible 'pop' could have been soft tissue structures sliding over joint surfaces. The 'surprisingly good' sensation you experienced post-pop could have been from the release of tension that comes with pulling an impinged joint apart. Anterior hip impingement is common in athletes who spend any significant amount of time in hip abduction, particular martial artists who do a lot of side kicks, side splits etc. You said it was your right hip that popped; I'm curious, are you predominantly right-legged in your taekwondo practice?
     
  3. liero

    liero Valued Member

    Space in the joint capsule, this is a good thing? Or a bad thing?
    My right leg is definitely my preferred leg. And the side kick, front leg turning kick are my bread and butter.

    I'm not doing much TKD at the moment, maybe 1x per week. But very low intensity. But the issue developed when I was 5-9 sessions per week.

    I was doing some simple google-fu reading, and based on my body alignment at the moment, and my extensive sedentary lifestyle (which is very soon to change) I diagnosed myself with a case of anterior pelvic tilt...could both that and what you are referring to be related?

    The following workout was my 2-3 time per week hip rehab:

    Lung Lunge Stretch- (focus on squeezing but cheecks and activating psoas)- 3x1 min rds each, work in ISO contractions
    Quad Stretch- Pull foot to butt
    Glute Bridge- Focus = contraction on glutes
    Plank/Side Plank- Increasing over time
    Reverse Crunch
    Yoga Cat Stretch
    Clam Stretch
    Lunge Stretch with bands
    Back to wall, hold knee above hip for time

    This is in addition to my current bodybuilding routine which is mixing up each week but contains a nice combination of all over lifts including: squats, deadlifts, isolations on machines for the legs, hanging leg raises, sit ups, calf presses. (leaving out the upper body stuff).
     
  4. liero

    liero Valued Member

    Last edited: Nov 19, 2015

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