Muay Thai/Dutch Kickboxing/North American Kickboxing

Discussion in 'Thai Boxing' started by newgymer1981, Aug 15, 2016.

  1. newgymer1981

    newgymer1981 Member

    First off, by no means am I going to compete because I am 35 and just started getting into this stuff. My goal is to learn a self-defense technique, while getting into peak shape. At the same time, I want to learn how to do things properly.

    I took a Dutch Kickboxing class for about 1.5 months (going twice a week) and just started kickboxing. However, I want to start Muay Thai as well.

    If I do Muay Thai and North American kickboxing, would this help or hinder me? I've noticed the stances are slightly different. I know Muay Thai and BJJ go well together, but I don't think I can do BJJ. It's too hard for me. I might want to do boxing too, but the stances in boxing vs Muay Thai are so different that I'm afraid I might confuse myself.

    Any advice?
     
  2. Ben Gash CLF

    Ben Gash CLF Valued Member

    Is American kickboxing shiny trousers and footpads?
     
  3. newgymer1981

    newgymer1981 Member

    Umm..no. Just a lot less clinching and kicks above the waist. The stance is also more bouncy as well.
     
  4. aaradia

    aaradia Choy Li Fut and Yang Tai Chi Chuan Student Moderator Supporter

    I personally believe in getting a foundation in one style first before expanding into other styles. When you say just started- exactly how new are you to it?

    To do several styles at once, you should be able to do them without getting the principles and movements all mixed up AND have enough time to devote to each style to properly learn it.
     
  5. Knee Rider

    Knee Rider Valued Member Supporter

    Depends how strict your coaches are with your form and how you compartmentalise your training.

    Thai boxing has a squarer stance than boxing which is more bladed. Weight distribution is also different and different between schools of Muay thai depending on how your coach wants it.

    American kickboxing usually only kicks above the waist and stances vary a lot from what I've seen.

    Striking mechanics can differ in details between them all.

    I'd just try it all and see what you like and just cross any issues as you come to them :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2016
  6. Unreal Combat

    Unreal Combat Valued Member

    American Kickboxing is shiny pants and footguards. :)

    I started out in American Kickboxing before transitioning into K1 Rules Kickboxing & Muay Thai. I found that the main differences were the stance work and obviously the lack of low kicking, knees, elbows, clinchwork, etc in American Kickboxing.

    If you want to train in Muay Thai I would drop the American Kickboxing purely because the stance work will just conflict with the Muay Thai. Dutch Kickboxing/K1 Rules Kickboxing tends to work better due to more similarities with a lot of clubs that tend to pull a lot of their striking techniques from Muay Thai, though there's a lot more reliance on hands and body shots with hands due to the limited clinch rules and lack of elbows.

    American Kickboxing is generally losing popularity nowadays due to its limitations so you'll be better off with K1 Rules/Dutch Kickboxing or Muay Thai to be honest. Nothing wrong with American Kickboxing though a lot of clubs that practice it are on the verge of being McDojos (at least in the UK any way).

    As for competing, I know people older than you who still compete. I'm 37 by the next time I compete. You could compete after a year or two if you put enough time into it and pick it up fairly well, dependant on your fitness. What I did find however is that practicing K1 Rules Kickboxing & Muay Thai served me well when competing under American Kickboxing rules. I had developed strikes with better power, better conditioning and refined movement skills while retaining some of the more flashier stuff from training in Kickboxing techniques (like spinning back kicks, hook kicks and snapping roundhouses).
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2016
  7. newgymer1981

    newgymer1981 Member

    Very new. Only two to three months.
     
  8. aaradia

    aaradia Choy Li Fut and Yang Tai Chi Chuan Student Moderator Supporter

    My opinion would be to spend more time practicing this art and getting the foundation down before adding others. But I also suspect my opinion will be the minority opinion on here.

    Everyone has a different approach. :)
     
  9. newgymer1981

    newgymer1981 Member

    Maybe I'll play around with it for a month or so since my gym offfers Muay Thai and Boxing and I also have a Groupon for kickboxing that has yet to be used up.
     
  10. Pretty In Pink

    Pretty In Pink Moved on MAP 2017 Gold Award

    My advice is the same as UC. Those two styles work well together. I do muay thai and I box too. It doesn't hinder me but I've had experience in both.

    If you're not trying to be a world beater, just do both.
     
  11. Dead_pool

    Dead_pool the merc with the mouth MAP 2017 Moi Award

    How is bjj too hard for you but full muay thai is ok?

    Any decent gym will ease you in gently to any art.
     
  12. newgymer1981

    newgymer1981 Member

    Thanks great advice! I'll do both.

    Also, BJJ drills hurt my bum. I hate sitting down. I have no muscle or fat in my butt.
     
  13. Pretty In Pink

    Pretty In Pink Moved on MAP 2017 Gold Award

    You're talking to the skinniest guy on the forum! You shouldn't be on your butt, you should be on your back or knees ;D
     
  14. Dead_pool

    Dead_pool the merc with the mouth MAP 2017 Moi Award

    If only their was a padded surface you could train on......
     
  15. Pretty In Pink

    Pretty In Pink Moved on MAP 2017 Gold Award

    To be clear when I say back I really mean you should be on your side. You shouldn't ever ACTUALLY be lying flat on your back.
     
  16. newgymer1981

    newgymer1981 Member

    Yeah it still hurts. I have very weak glutes.
     
  17. Smitfire

    Smitfire Cactus Schlong

    Except when using the deadly butt-scoot technique. If done right no can defend.
     
  18. Van Zandt

    Van Zandt Mr. High Kick

    Sweep the leg... or is it reap the knee?
     
  19. Smitfire

    Smitfire Cactus Schlong

    Scoot the butt?
     

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