Strategies Vs southpaws

Discussion in 'Kickboxing' started by Knee Rider, Sep 30, 2017.

  1. icefield

    icefield Valued Member

    It's always a good idea to set your combination up with the jab it's your range finder, trouble is Southpaws throw that off, what they do typically give you is forward movement coming in which sort of helps set the range for your right cross for you, as long as (as PIP says) you get your lead leg out side theres the range tends to be their automatically for the straight right down the pipe.
     
    Knee Rider likes this.
  2. Knee Rider

    Knee Rider Valued Member

    Cheers for all replies so far guys and girls.

    There is only one southpaw at my gym so the poor guy will get plenty of experience defending combinations of the right straight this week.

    Seems most advice says to gain the outside lead foot placement and work off the hook (which I already do) or the straight which I haven't been doing.

    Very much looking forward to adding it in.

    Keep em coming if you have them!
     
  3. icefield

    icefield Valued Member

    I think the main issue is while as PIP says everything that is open to a southpaw on a regular fighter is also there for you against a Southpaw so body kicks of the back leg, straight power punches of the back hand etc they are simply more used to putting those techniques into action against a lefty than you are against a Southpaw statically they will simply face more orthodox fighters so will be more comfortable
     
    Pretty In Pink and Knee Rider like this.
  4. Knee Rider

    Knee Rider Valued Member

    I think it's a sign I need to diversify my approach to a certain extent. I'm a creature of habit and my patterns and strategies are so based in orthodox Vs orthodox that I found myself following movement that just wasn't facilitating good offence and only really hitting off the counter or the clinch. Usually I find getting on the front foot and taking the offensive the most comfortable strategy for me but Vs a southpaw I found it much harder to gain rhythm using my default approach.

    I'm a more confident striker than the guy I was sparring so I managed to reduce damage and keep the pressure (in terms of % of hits landed) going my way for the most part, but if that wasn't the case I think it could have gone much worse for me. Definitely something to examine. Just can't wait to get back
     
  5. Dead_pool

    Dead_pool the merc with the mouth

    I was reading Jack slacks book on mcgregor today and there's a lot of info in their about how southpaw fight vs righties, which by definition is how you need to fight a southpaw if your a righty too.

    I think I've seen it in the works for a fiver, it's also cheap on amazon too.
    (maybe why he pulled his southpaw video too, it's all in the book)

    I think there's more info in his pugilism ebook too.
     
  6. Latikos

    Latikos Valued Member

    I tried to find something of the two guys, but the links I found for Jack Slack ran into nothingness.
    For other guy I was too dumb to find something useful.
    Will try again, but wanted to leave a little comment, since I mentioned I would look for something by these two.
     
  7. Pretty In Pink

    Pretty In Pink Valued Member



    That's Jack Slack he's also on Fightland and writes articles for them.

    Lawrence Kenshin is on instagram. Lodds of good stuff there.
     
  8. David Harrison

    David Harrison MAPper without portfolio

    I find it really interesting that left or right side forward might provide so many tactical dilemmas.

    For me, I think of it as different weapons having more natural targets, circling opening different targets, and takedowns and throws being different. That's it.

    I find the angle of stance making more difference than which leg is forward.
     
  9. aikiMac

    aikiMac boxing is fun Moderator Supporter

    For me it depends on how I'm approaching the fight. Escrima or aikido, I it hardly matter which arm/leg is forward. I barely give it any thought. But boxing has a very different rule set, one in which it very much matters whether you're a mirror image or a flipped image of the other guy.

    (There's one other southpaw at my gym, and when he and I were sparring a while back -- wow, that was so awkward! Everything was backwards! :p )
     
    David Harrison likes this.
  10. Knee Rider

    Knee Rider Valued Member

    I can only speak for myself but I found that it's not just the leg positioning but also the hand positioning and the angles of entry and footwork adjustments required to be effective offensively.

    I circle to the outside a lot and pick off the lead leg and jab neither of these things work the same from an orthodox stance Vs a southpaw so adjustments in strategy are required. One thing I love is to draw the jab and counter jab off the slip... This doesn't work against a lefty so I was slipping and hooking instead but the motor pattern is simply less practiced and less comfortable for me.

    My aim is to get some good rounds on the bag, shadow boxing and sparring to refine these less utilised tactics and try and find some other inventive ways to implement my favoured strategy against the different entries presented by a southpaw fighter.

    Fundamentals will always be fundamentals but the pattern of footwork, entry options, weapons and timings are all different to striking righty Vs lefty in my limited and newly acquired experience of working against a southpaw.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
    axelb, Dead_pool and David Harrison like this.

Share This Page